Alexander Vail, Esq., Of Counsel
Las Vegas Immigration and Criminal Defense Attorney


Se habla español. Nevada immigration attorney Alexander Vail, of counsel, brings to Las Vegas Defense Group invaluable insight from behind enemy lines: During his prior clerkship with the Clark County District Attorney's Office's Appeals Unit, he learned firsthand how the state builds cases against defendants. Now Alexander uses this insider information to craft a proactive defense and stay one step ahead of the D.A.

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Las Vegas Defense Group was voted the 2018 and 2017 Best Criminal Defense Firm Gold Winner in Las Vegas Review-Journal's annual "Best of Las Vegas”! Las Vegas Defense Group was also voted Best Immigration Firm Silver Winner for 2018 and 2017!

An Army ROTC Distinguished Military Graduate, Alexander earned magna cum laude honors from the University of Miami School of Law. There he earned placement in Order of the Coif, served as a student attorney at removal proceedings in the Immigration Clinic, and was first in his class several times, including in immigration law. Following prestigious externships with the Broward County Public Defender's Office and an Eleventh Court of Appeals judge, Alexander was selected as an attorney advisor for the Office of the Chief Immigration Judge, Executive Office for Immigration Review, of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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Alexander has extensive experience in all stages of criminal and immigration cases, at both the trial and appellate levels. He is a tireless researcher and writer as well as a skilled negotiator and litigator. Las Vegas Defense Group is proud to have Alexander as part of its of counsel team. He brings an insatiable passion for safeguarding the rights and championing the cause of his immigration and criminal defense clients. Alexander is also licensed to practice law in Florida.

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Recent Cases:

  • Bond granted

Matter of O.L.R. (2019)

O.L.R. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been convicted for battery in violation of California law and had been most recently arrested for open and gross lewdness in violation of Nevada law. After he was released on his own recognizance in the pending criminal case, he was transferred to immigration custody where the Department of Homeland Security refused to release O.L.R. on a bond. Alex filed a motion seeking a custody redetermination hearing with the Las Vegas Immigration Court on his behalf, arguing that O.L.R. did not pose a danger to the community or a risk of flight. Satisfied with the evidence presented, the presiding immigration judge set a bond. O.L.R. was released from immigration custody after posting this bond.

  • Lawful permanent residence granted

Matter of R.R.L. (2019)

R.R.L. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had entered the United States with an H1A work visa. While in the United States, he fell in love with and married a United States citizen. He subsequently sought the help of Alex to adjust his status to that of a lawful permanent resident. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) ultimately granted R.R.L.'s adjustment application under section 245(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. R.R.L. is now a lawful permanent resident of the United States.

  • Citizenship granted

Matter of F.O. (2019)

F.O., is a native and citizen of the El Salvador who after being a lawful permanent resident for more than 20 years sought the aid of Alex to file an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”). He had previously been convicted of driving under the influence in violation of Georgia law and was concerned of the impact this conviction might have on his Form N-400. He was also concerned about his ability to satisfy the English language requirement. Alex explained that he would be exempt from the English language requirement because he was over 50 years of age and had been a permanent resident for over 20 years. Alex further explained how F.O's conviction did not preclude him from establishing good moral character. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) agreed, approved F.O. for naturalization, and he has been sworn in as a United States citizen.

  • Citizenship granted

Matter of D.S. (2019)

D.S., a native and citizen of the Philippines who had been admitted as a lawful permanent resident of the United States, sought the aid of Alex to file an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”). Alex prepared the Form N-400 filing, prepared D.S. for her interview, and attended the interview with D.S. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) approved her for naturalization, and she has been sworn in as a United States citizen.

  • Citizenship granted

Matter of E.M.D.M. (2019)

E.M.D.M., a native and citizen of the Mexico who had been admitted as a lawful permanent resident of the United States, sought the aid of Alex to file an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”). She had recently been convicted of driving under the influence in violation of Arizona law and was concerned that this conviction would result in the denial of her Form N-400. Alex prepared the Form N-400 filing, taking special efforts to explain in a memorandum of law why E.M.D.M.'s conviction did not preclude her from establishing good moral character. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) agreed, approved E.M.D.M. for naturalization, and she has been sworn in as a United States citizen.

  • Citizenship granted

Matter of E.C.A. (2019)

E.C.A., a native and citizen of the Philippines who had been admitted as a lawful permanent resident of the United States, sought the aid of Alex to file an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”). Alex prepared the Form N-400 filing, prepared E.C.A. for his interview, and attended the interview with E.C.A. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) approved him for naturalization, and he has been sworn in as a United States citizen.

  • Lawful permanent residence granted

Matter of S.V.G. (2019)

S.V.G. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had entered the United States with a B2 tourist visa as a young child. She was, however, “waved through” by the immigration official and thus never received a stamp in her passport or any other official documentation to prove that she lawfully entered the United States. Married to a United States citizen, she sought Alex's help to apply for adjustment of status with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”). Alex carefully prepared the case and included in the adjustment filing a detailed memorandum of law that explained how the evidence provided was sufficient to meet S.V.G.'s burden of proving that she presented herself to immigration authorities in a “procedurally regular manner” and was thus “inspected and admitted” to the United States. See Matter of Quilantan, 25 I&N Dec. 285 (BIA 2010). Upon review of the evidence furnished and the arguments presented, USCIS granted S.V.G.'s adjustment application under section 245(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. S.V.G. is now a lawful permanent resident of the United States.

  • Removal proceedings avoided

Matter of R.R.B. (2019)

R.R.B. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been admitted to the United States as a lawful permanent resident when she was a minor. After being convicted of battery with substantial bodily harm in violation of Nevada law decades thereafter, she was sentenced to a term of imprisonment in the Nevada Department of Corrections. As R.R.B. was nearing the end of her term of imprisonment, she learned that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) had placed a detainer on her (colloquially referred to as an “ICE hold”) and intended to initiate removal proceedings upon her release from criminal custody. When this information was conveyed to R.R.B.'s family, they contacted Alex with this distressing news. Upon examining the case and learning all relevant facts, Alex determined that R.R.B. had automatically derived United States citizenship pursuant to section 320 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. He immediately prepared an Application for Certificate of Citizenship (“Form N-600”) and filed it with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”). Upon receiving the receipt from USCIS, Alex immediately prepared correspondence to the local ICE office in Las Vegas that included the Form N-600 pending with USCIS, all relevant supporting documentation to support R.R.B.'s claim to citizenship, and legal argument explaining how R.R.B. had met all of the elements under section 320 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The local ICE office reviewed all of the supporting documents and lifted the detainer that it had placed on R.R.B. Removal proceedings were never initiated, and R.R.B. has finally received her Certificate of Citizenship.

  • Bond granted

Matter of B.A.S.R. (2019)

B.A.S.R. is a native and citizen of Mexico who entered the United States in 2004. He had been convicted twice for battery constituting domestic violence in violation of Nevada law a few years thereafter. He had most recently been arrested again for battery constituting domestic violence. After posting bail in the criminal case, he was taken into custody by the Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”) Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) and removal proceedings were initiated. At the time of his initial bond hearing, the battery domestic violence charge had been pending. Finding B.A.S.R. a danger to the community on the basis of the two previous convictions for battery domestic violence and a pending charge for the same, the immigration judge initially denied bond. However, the pending charge was ultimately “denied” by the City of Las Vegas Attorney's Office, which had decided to not prosecute B.A.S.R. With proof that the City Attorney's Office had decided not to prosecute B.A.S.R., Alex filed a second custody redetermination hearing in which he argued that there had been a “material” change in circumstances under 8 C.F.R. § 1003.19(e). After reviewing this proof along with the additional supporting evidence submitted with the bond request, the presiding immigration judge was satisfied that B.A.S.R. did not pose a danger to the community and set a bond in the case.

  • Hardship waiver approved and lawful permanent residence granted

Matter of N.O.C. (2019)

N.O.C. is a native and citizen of Mexico who last entered the United States with a B2 tourist visa over a decade ago. On the basis of her marriage to a United States citizen, N.O.C. sought to adjust her status to that of a lawful permanent resident. After her initial interview, however, she was found inadmissible under section 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II) of the Immigration and Nationality Act by virtue of the fact that she had previously entered the United States with her B2 visa, overstayed beyond the period of authorized stay, and had then reentered the United States again as a tourist before she had spent 10 years outside of the country. On her behalf, Alex prepared an Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility (“Form I-601”) and explained in a detailed memorandum of law why the denial of a waiver of this ground of inadmissibility would result in extreme hardship to her United States citizen spouse. Satisfied with the evidence presented and the arguments made on her behalf, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) granted N.O.C.'s Form I-601 and subsequently granted N.O.C.'s Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status (“Form I-485”). N.O.C. is now a lawful permanent resident of the United States.

  • Lawful permanent residence granted

Matter of N.T.V. (2019)

N.T.V. is a native and citizen of Brazil who had entered the United States with a B2 tourist visa several years ago and had overstayed beyond the period of authorized stay. Married to a United States citizen, she sought to fix her immigration status but was concerned because of the visa overstay. Alex explained to her that as the “immediate relative” of a United States citizen (as that term is defined in the Immigration and Nationality Act), she would still be eligible to adjust her status. Accordingly, on her behalf, Alex filed an adjustment of status application with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”). Alex also prepared both N.T.V. and her husband for the adjustment interview and accompanied them to this interview. USCIS granted N.T.V.'s adjustment application under section 245(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. N.T.V. is now a lawful permanent resident of the United States.

  • Lawful permanent residence granted

Matter of R.M.M. (2019)

R.M.M. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been granted a U visa. After residing continuously in the United States for three years, she sought Alex's assistance in the preparation and filing of an adjustment of status application. After securing all of the necessary supporting documentation—which included evidence that R.M.M. had not “unreasonably refused” to provide assistance to the Clark County District Attorney's Office in the prosecution of the qualifying criminal activity that resulted in her U nonimmigrant status—Alex prepared a comprehensive filing that explained why R.M.M. is statutorily eligible to adjust status under section 245(m) of the Immigration and Nationality Act and why she merited adjustment in the exercise of discretion. USCIS granted R.M.M.'s adjustment application under section 245(m), and R.M.M. is now a lawful permanent resident of the United States.

  • Citizenship granted

Matter of Y.K. (2019)

Y.K., a native and citizen of Russia who had been admitted as a lawful permanent resident of the United States several decades ago, sought the aid of Alex to file an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”). Y.K. had been concerned about filing the Form N-400 because during the relevant five-year period, she had taken a seven-month trip abroad to Russia to care for her ailing mother. Alex prepared the Form N-400 filing, which included a detailed memorandum of law in which Alex argued that if the agency took into account all of the factors set out in 8 C.F.R. § 316.5(c)—the regulation that sets out a non-exhaustive list of factors for adjudicators to consider when assessing whether a lawful permanent resident's absence in excess of six months constitutes a disruption in continuous residence—it should find that Y.K.'s absence in excess of six months did not disrupt her “continuous residence” in the United States. Upon review of the filing, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) agreed with the arguments advanced and found that Y.K.'s trip of over seven months did not disrupt her “continuous residence.” It further found that Y.K had otherwise established her eligibility for naturalization and subsequently approved her for naturalization. Y.K. has been sworn in as a United States citizen.

  • Removal Proceedings Cancelled and Permanent Residence Conferred

Matter of N.G.F. (2019)

N.G.F. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had entered the United States more than a decade ago without being inspected and admitted. He was arrested by the Department of Homeland Security as a result of active enforcement efforts in the region where he lived. On his behalf, Alex prepared, filed, and litigated to completion an Application for Cancellation of Removal and Adjustment of Status for Certain Nonpermanent Residents (“Form EOIR-42B”), arguing that N.G.F. (1) had the requisite 10 years of continuous physical presence, (2) that he had been a person of good moral character during this timeframe, and (3) that his removal from the United States would result in exceptional and extremely unusual hardship to his United States citizen daughter. Satisfied with the evidence presented, the presiding immigration judge found that N.G.F. had satisfied all the statutory requirements, and he further concluded that N.G.F. merited relief in the exercise of discretion. N.G.F's removal proceedings were cancelled, and he was granted lawful permanent residence.

  • Adjustment Application Granted and Permanent Residence Conferred

Matter of E.K. (2019)

E.K. is a native and citizen of Rwanda who had entered the United States on a B1 visa. He had timely applied for asylum, but his case had been referred by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) to the Immigration Court for further proceedings. While these removal proceedings were ongoing, E.K. married a lawful permanent resident of the United States who had an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”) pending with USCIS. When E.K. met with Alex, Alex explained that his marriage to a lawful permanent resident, who was soon to become a United States citizen, provided him another possible form of relief from removal. Upon becoming counsel of record in the case, Alex immediately filed a Petition for Alien Relative (“Form I-130”) with USCIS on E.K.'s behalf (on the basis of E.K's marriage to a lawful permanent resident). Alex then presented proof of the filing as well as proof of the interview that had been scheduled for the Form N-400 filed by E.K's spouse. The presiding immigration judge agreed to continue the matter until a final decision was made by USCIS on the Form I-130. After the Form I-130 was approved, Alex filed an Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status (“Form I-485”) with the Immigration Court. Satisfied with the evidence presented in support of the Form I-485, the presiding immigration judge found that E.K. had established statutory eligibility for adjustment of status, and he further concluded that E.K. merited relief in the exercise of discretion. Finally, after 6 years of being in removal proceedings, E.K. was granted lawful permanent residence.

  • Lawful Permanent Residence Granted

Matter of M.M.R. (2019)

M.M.R. is a native and citizen of Canada who sought to immigrate to the United States as the spouse of a U.S. citizen. Having both lived in Canada for decades, M.M.R. and her husband sought Alex's help in the process to ensure no hiccups. From the filing of the initial family petition and all the way through consular processing, Alex helped make the process as smooth as possible for M.M.R. and her husband. After her interview at the consulate, M.M.R. was issued an immigrant visa and has recently immigrated to the United States.

  • Lawful Permanent Residence Granted

Matter of J.A. (2019)

J.A. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had initially entered the United States decades ago without being inspected and admitted. Her son, who was born in the United States, serves in the United States armed forces. With the help of Alex, she first applied for parole-in-place with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) Las Vegas Application Support Center. After she was granted parole, Alex helped her apply for adjustment of status. Less than five months after filing her adjustment application, J.A. was approved for permanent residence.

  • Citizenship Granted

Matter of N.S. (2019)

N.S., a native and citizen of Turkey who had been admitted as a lawful permanent resident of the United States a few years back, sought the aid of Alex to file an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”). Alex prepared the Form N-400 filing, prepared N.S. for her interview, and attended the interview with N.S. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) approved her for naturalization, and she has been sworn in as a United States citizen.

  • DUI Dropped To Reckless Driving

Matter of C.L. (2019)

C.L. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had arrested for driving under the influence. Alex was able to negotiate a deal with the Clark County District Attorney's Office whereby the DUI charge would be reduced to Reckless Driving if C.L. paid a fine, completed the Victim Impact Panel, DUI School, and the Coroner's Program. C.L. successfully completed all court-imposed requirements and so was only found guilty of the reduced charge of Reckless Driving.

  • Citizenship Granted

Matter of C.R. (2019)

C.R. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been admitted as a lawful permanent resident of the United States several decades ago. He had been reluctant to file an Application for Naturalization (“Form N-400”) because of certain criminal convictions that he had in the past. With the guidance of Alex, he ultimately decided to apply. Accepting that he was, in fact, a person of good moral character (and not judging him by mistakes made long ago), USCIS approved him for naturalization, and C.R. sworn in as a United States citizen.

  • Certificate of Citizenship Conferred

Matter of J.C. (2019)

J.C. is a native and citizen of Germany who had been admitted to the United States as a lawful permanent resident of the United States back in 1985. More than 30 years later, she sought the advice of Alex regarding the steps that needed to be taken to acquire naturalization. After discussing all relevant facts surrounding J.C.'s situation, Alex and J.C. agreed to pursue an Application for Certificate of Citizenship (“Form N-600”). Alex prepared a detailed memorandum of law in which he presented to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services all of the relevant facts and why J.C., under the law as it existed prior to the Child Citizenship Act of 2000, would have automatically derived United States citizenship. The agency agreed and, after her oath ceremony, J.C. was given her Certificate of Citizenship.

  • Bond Granted

Matter of M.R. (2019)

M.R. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been arrested for assault with a deadly weapon in violation of Nevada law and subsequently convicted of battery constituting domestic violence. After being released from criminal custody, she was transferred to immigration custody where the Department of Homeland Security refused to release M.R. on a bond. Alex filed a motion seeking a custody redetermination hearing with the Las Vegas Immigration Court on her behalf, arguing that M.R. did not pose a danger to the community or a risk of flight. Satisfied with the evidence presented, the presiding immigration judge set a bond. M.R. was released from immigration custody after posting this bond.

  • Bond Granted

Matter of F.J.M. (2019)

F.J.M. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been arrested for battery constituting domestic violence in violation of Nevada law. After bail was posted in the pending criminal case, he was transferred to immigration custody where the Department of Homeland Security refused to release F.J.M. on a bond. Alex filed a motion seeking a custody redetermination hearing with the Las Vegas Immigration Court on his behalf, arguing that F.J.M did not pose a danger to the community or a risk of flight. Satisfied with the evidence presented, the presiding immigration judge set a bond. F.J.M was released from immigration custody after posting this bond.

  • Permanent Residence Granted 

Matter of M.D.G. (2019)

M.D.G., a native and citizen of the Philippines, was engaged to a United States citizen and sought to immigrate to the United States. She entered the United States on a K-1 visa and adjusted her status to that of a lawful permanent resident with the help of Alex.

  • Bond granted

Matter of N.E.G. (2019)

N.E.G. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been previously convicted of burglary and possession of a drug not to be introduced in interstate commerce in violation of Nevada law. He had most recently been arrested for conspiracy to commit battery and felony child abuse in violation of Nevada law. After posting bond and being released from criminal custody, he was taken into immigration custody. Alex prepared a motion, seeking a custody redetermination hearing on his behalf. The immigration judge, satisfied with evidence presented in support of the motion, found that N.E.G. did not pose a danger to the community and set a bond. N.E.G. was released from immigration custody.

  • Bond granted

Matter of E.A. (2019)

E.A. is a native and citizen of Israel who had been taken into criminal custody for disorderly conduct and resisting arrest in violation of Nevada law. After being released on his own recognizance from criminal custody, he was taken into immigration custody. Alex prepared a motion, seeking a custody redetermination hearing on his behalf. The immigration judge, satisfied with evidence presented in support of the motion, found that E.A. did not pose a danger to the community and set a bond. E.A. was released from immigration custody.

  • Bond granted

Matter of N.V. (2019)

N.V. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been wrongly arrested for battery domestic violence and felony child abuse in violation of Nevada law. After posting bail and being released from criminal custody, he was taken into immigration custody. Alex prepared a motion, seeking a custody redetermination hearing on his behalf. The immigration judge, satisfied with evidence presented in support of the motion, found that N.V. did not pose a danger to the community and set a bond. N.V. was released from immigration custody.

  • Bond granted

Matter of R.A.M. (2019)

R.A.M. is a native and citizen of Mexico who had been convicted of driving under the influence in violation of California law and possession of a firearm by a prohibited person in violation of Nevada law. He was picked up by local law enforcement on an outstanding bench warrant. After serving a two-month term of imprisonment, he was transferred into immigration custody. Alex prepared a motion, seeking a custody redetermination hearing on his behalf. The immigration judge, satisfied with evidence presented in support of the motion, found that R.A.M. did not pose a danger to the community and set a bond. R.A.M. was released from immigration custody.

  • Policy Denying Noncitizens Right To Post Bail Rescinded

Palafox-Lugo v. Eighth Judicial District Court, et. al., No. 2:18-cv-01796-APG-GWF (2018)

Alex filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada against both the Eighth Judicial District Court and the Las Vegas Justice Court, alleging violations of 42 U.S.C. § 1983 seeking declaratory and injunctive relief. The issue was each court's policy of denying bail to noncitizen detainees with detainers placed on them by the Department of Homeland Security Immigration and Customs Enforcement (colloquially known as “ICE holds”). This policy stemmed from “standing” administrative orders issued by each state court—specifically, by the Eighth Judicial District Court in September of 2001 and by the Las Vegas Justice Court in February of 2002.

Shortly after suit was filed, counsel for both the Eighth Judicial District Court and the Las Vegas Justice Court conferred with Alex and agreed to settle the matter by having the court rescind these standing orders initially issued by the state courts that limited a noncitizen's ability to post bail.

On October 8, 2018, the Eighth Judicial District Court issued its order, rescinding the 2001 order and directing the clerk to accept bail bonds or cash bail without regard to an individual's immigration status. A little more than one week later, the Las Vegas Justice Court followed suit.

  • Citizenship Granted

Matter of P.L. (2018)

P.L. is a native and citizen of Vietnam who sought naturalization. He had previously applied on his own and was denied. With the help of Alex, he again applied and was approved.

  • Citizenship Granted

Matter of A.G. (2018)

A.G. is a native and citizen of Mexico who applied for naturalization. Alex guided her through the process and with his help, her application for naturalization was approved

  • Battery domestic violence charge dismissed

In re. I.R. (2018)

Our client, a native and citizen of Mexico, was charged with battery domestic violence in violation of section 200.485.1 of the Nevada Revised Statutes. He maintained his innocence, we entered a not guilty plea, and set the case for trial. On the date of the trial, the Clark County District Attorney's Office moved to dismiss the case. Case dismissed.

  • DUI charge reduced to reckless driving

In re. R.S. (2018)

Our client, a native and citizen of Germany, was charged with (1) driving under the influence in violation of section 484C.110 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and (2) failure to yield the right-of-way in violation of section 484B.260 of the Nevada Revised Statutes. Alex was able to secure the following negotiation, which the Justice of the Peace presiding over the case followed: a no-contest plea to the charge of driving under the influence under a stay of adjudication; upon payment of (1) a fine of $685, (2) completion of DUI school, and (3) completion of the Victim Impact Panel, the case would be amended the reckless driving. Our client completed all requirements and the DUI charge was amended to reckless driving. The failure to yield the right of way charge was dropped altogether.

  • Parole-in-place granted

In re. J.A. (2018)

Our client is a native and citizen of Mexico who entered the United States years ago without being inspected and admitted. We applied for parole-in-place with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service Application Support Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. After considering the equities in her case, USCIS granted her application for parole-in-place, effectively making her eligible for adjustment of status to become a legal permanent resident.

  • Green card granted

In re. Y.C. (2018)

Las Vegas Defense Group attorney Alexander Vail help our client -- a Chinese citizen in the U.S. on an B1/B2 visitor visa -- through the process to become a legal permanent resident.

  • Green card granted

In re. E.N. (2018)

Las Vegas Defense Group attorney Alexander Vail help our client -- a Nigerian in the U.S. on an F-1 student visa -- through the process to become a legal permanent resident.

  • Citizenship granted

In re. M.P. (2018)

Las Vegas Defense Group attorney Alexander Vail walked the client through the naturalization process. She was recommended for approval by USCIS, and she was sworn in as a U.S. citizen on June 8, 2018.

  • Removal proceedings stopped

In re. R.P. (2018)

Our client was facing deportation for convictions of Attempt to Commit Possession of Credit or Debit Card without Cardholder's Consent in violation of Nev. Rev. Stat. §§ 193.330, 205.690 as well as Attempt Forgery in violation of Nev. Rev. Stat. §§ 193.330, 205.090, 205.110. Las Vegas Defense Group attorney Alexander Vail argued that the DHS was unable to prove by clear and convincing evidence that our client is deportable under either section 237(a)(2)(A)(iii) or section 237(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. Specifically, he argued that the attempt credit card charge was not an aggravated felony, and that the attempt forgery charge was not a crime of moral turpitude, and that the law is unconstitutionally vague. The judge granted the motion, and the client will not face deportation.

  • Citizenship granted

In re. F.A. (2018)

Alex walked our client through the naturalization process, she was recommended for citizenship, and she recently took her oath of citizenship. 

  • Conditions on residence removed

In re. C. (2018)

Our client had his individual hearing postponed to 2019 because the judge had a scheduling conflict. Alex filed a motion to terminate along with a pre-hearing brief in Support of Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence, where Alex argued this case did not need an individual hearing. The judge agreed.

  • Felony drug case dismissed; deportation avoided

In re. A.A. (2018)

The client was charged as an alien deportable for being convicted of an aggravated felony drug offense. Alex argued that the Department of Homeland Security did not meet its burden of proving by clear and convincing evidence that the client is deportable under section 237(a)(2)(A)(iii) of the Immigration and Nationality Act for two reasons:

  1. First, that the DHS cannot even prove that the client is an “alien” subject to the provisions of section 237 of the Act because the client automatically acquired United States citizenship pursuant to section 320 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
  2. Second, that the DHS cannot prove by clear and convincing evidence that Respondent's conviction for possession of controlled substance with intent to sell in violation of NRS 453.337 is a conviction for an aggravated felony as that term is defined in section 101(a)(43)(B) of the Act because NRS 453.337 is an overbroad and indivisible statute that proscribes offenses outside the scope of section 101(a)(43)(B) of the Act.

The immigration judge presiding over the case (arguably, the harshest and most conservative of the four judges here at the Las Vegas Immigration Court) issued a decision dismissing the aggravated felony drug charge and terminating proceedings.

The client no longer faces deportation.

  • Green card granted

In re. R.G. (2018)

Our client had a visa and wished to adjust status to a legal permanent resident. Alex completed his application, and within two and a half months his green card was granted.

  • Citizenship granted

In re. J.Z. (2018)

Alex walked our client through the naturalization process, including attending his naturalization interview with him. Our client was recommended for citizenship at the end of the interview and recently took his oath of citizenship. 

  • Felony drug charge dismissed

State v. E.S. (Las Vegas Justice Court, 2017)

Our client was charged with felony possession of methamphetamine. Alex negotiated a deal where our client paid a $500 fine and completed a drug evaluation in exchange for the charge being totally dismissed (meaning there is no drug conviction on Client's record).

  • Green card granted

In re. A.H. (2017)

Alex helped our client adjust status to legal permanent resident and attended her marriage interview.

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