Nevada Larceny Crimes Defense Lawyers

Nevada theft crimes may carry high fines and long prison times. And if you ever apply for a job, the employer may pass you over once they see a theft conviction on your record.

Our Las Vegas criminal defense attorneys have been very successful in getting theft charges lowered to less serious offenses or even dismissed so your criminal record stays clean. And if necessary, we are always prepared to fight for you at trial.

Below is a list of links to all our Nevada theft offense information pages including larceny, shoplifting, burglary, robbery, auto-theft, and possession of stolen goods. Go to any one to learn the law, penalties, and how we can help your case.

  • Las Vegas crime of petit larceny (NRS 205.240)

Petit larceny is the theft of money or property that is valued at less than $650. An example of petit larceny is going to a food stand at Cashman Field and taking a hot dog without paying. Prosecutors will usually dismiss a first-time offense in exchange for restitution, a fine and Petit Larceny School. Go to our page on the Las Vegas crime of petit larceny.
  • Las Vegas crime of grand larceny (NRS 205.220)

Grand larceny is stealing money or property that is valued at $650 or more. Taking a famous painting from the Bellagio Art Gallery would be charged as grand larceny. In many cases these charges result from misunderstandings or accidents where no criminal activity occurred. Read more about the Las Vegas crime of grand larceny.
  • Las Vegas crime of shoplifting (NRS 205.220 & NRS 205.240)

Retail theft is a kind of larceny involving the taking of store merchandise without paying first. Stealing a handbag from Dillard's in the Fashion Show Mall would be considered shoplifting. Often the D.A. will be willing to reduce or dismiss these charges if you pay restitution and take a class about theft crimes. Learn more about the Las Vegas crime of shoplifting.
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  • Las Vegas crime of burglary (NRS 205.060)

Burglary theft is the act of entering a building or vehicle with the intent to steal inside. Therefore someone who breaks into a Henderson home with the purpose of stealing a widescreen TV may be charged with burglary. If the prosecutor cannot prove that, at the time you entered the car or structure, you intended to steal property...then Las Vegas burglary charges cannot be sustained. Read more about the Las Vegas crime of burglary.
  • Las Vegas crime of robbery (NRS 200.380)

Robbery is the taking of another's personal property by using force or threats. A classic example is holding up a cashier at a North Las Vegas gas station. it is not uncommon for people to be wrongly accused of this offense because of misidentifications made by witnesses: Robbers typically wear ski masks, and robberies often happen too fast for anyone to get a clear picture of the culprit. For more go to our page on the Las Vegas crime of robbery.
  • Las Vegas crime of larceny from a person (NRS 205.270)

This is the legal name for "pick-pocketing." Often the stealing happens so stealthily that the victim does not realize he/she has been stolen from until later when they cannot find the property. Unlike robbery, larceny from a person does not require the use of force or threats: For example, confronting a woman on the Strip and demanding her purse would be charged as robbery because the victim was threatened. But taking her purse while she is not looking is "larceny from a person" because no force or threats were used. Learn more at our page on the Las Vegas crime of larceny from a person.
  • Las Vegas crime of possession of stolen property (NRS 200.275)

It is illegal to possess or receive property that you know has been stolen. But you have committed no offense if you did not know (or should have known) that it was stolen: For example, buying a watch from someone you recognize from the Las Vegas Sun as a wanted thief could make you liable for receipt of stolen property. Read more at our page on the Las Vegas crime of possession of stolen property.
  • Las Vegas crime of possession of lost property (NRS 205.0832(d))

If you find property in Nevada you know is lost, you may not keep it unless you take reasonable measures to find the rightful owner first. For example, if you find a purse at a mall, you should look for the ID and contact the owner or else turn it over to security. Read more in our article on the Las Vegas crime of theft of lost property.
  • Las Vegas crime of embezzlement (NRS 205.300)

Embezzlement is when a person steals property that originally he/she was legally in possession of. An example is failing to return a rented car on time. Read more in our article on the Las Vegas crime of theft of lost property.
  • Las Vegas crime of possession of bait purse theft (NRS 205.0832(d))

If you find a purse, wallet or other item in a public place such as a casino, it may be a plant by local police looking to arrest would-be thieves. For example, if you find a wallet at a casino, best just to ignore it and alert security. If you take it for yourself, you could be arrested for theft. Read more in our article on the Las Vegas crime of theft of lost property.
  • Las Vegas crime of possession of looting

Looting typically occurs during riots, protests, or natural or man-made disasters. Either way, it is illegal. Read more in our article on the Las Vegas crime of looting.
  • Las Vegas crime of possession of a stolen vehicle (NRS 200.273)

It is unlawful not only to steal a car but also to buy or possess a car that you know is stolen. But you are not liable if you were not aware that the car was stolen: For instance, it is criminal to buy a car when there is something suspicious about the sale (such as no title papers) that would tip off a reasonable person that the car is stolen. For more go to our page on the Las Vegas crime of possession of a stolen vehicle.
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  • Las Vegas crime of grand larceny of a motor vehicle (NRS 200.228)

Auto-theft is the intentional stealing of a car. Examples are failing to return a rented car at the Las Vegas airport, or failing to pay for a car you bought in the Valley Auto Mall. Note that borrowing a car when you honestly believe the owner gave you permission to is not auto-theft. For more read our page on the Las Vegas crime of grand larceny of a motor vehicle.
  • Las Vegas crime of grand larceny of a firearm

Stealing a firearm is always a felony in Nevada, even if the gun was not worth much money. For more read our page on the Las Vegas crime of grand larceny of a firearm.
  • Las Vegas crime of trick-rolling

Trick-rolling occurs when an alleged prostitute steals money or other property from a customer. A person may be prosecuted for trick-rolling whether or not any sex took place. Trick-rolling may be prosecuted as a robbery or
larceny from a person depending on whether the prostitute used force or threats. To learn more go to our page on the Las Vegas crime of trick-rolling.

Accused of theft in Nevada? Call us . . . .

Our Las Vegas criminal defense attorneys may be able to get your theft charges lessened to lower charges or dropped completely. Call us at 702-DEFENSE (702-333-3673) for a free consultation.

To learn about California theft crimes, go to our informational page on California theft crimes. And if you are an immigrant, note that theft may be a crime involving moral turpitude in Nevada. iI is important you retain counsel right away to try to get the charge dismissed or changed to a non-removable offense that is not considered a crime of moral turpitude in Nevada so you can stay in the U.S.

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