How to Restore Your California Gun Rights

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California's firearms laws are strict and federal laws are even stricter. If you are convicted of a felony or certain misdemeanors, you will lose your right to possess a gun in California.

You also may not own or possess a gun if you are:

  • addicted to narcotics drugs,
  • mentally ill,
  • under the age of 18,
  • prohibited from possessing a gun by court order or as a condition of probation, or
  • prohibited by federal law from possessing a gun.

Conviction of a felony results in a lifetime ban on gun possession.

Conviction on most misdemeanor charges does not prohibit you from having a gun. But a few weapons-related misdemeanor convictions do subject you to a lifetime ban. Two convictions for brandishing a firearm... or just one conviction for assault with a firearm conviction...will cost you your gun rights for life.

In addition, approximately 40 misdemeanors carry a 10-year firearms ban. These include:

  • assault,
  • battery,
  • brandishing a weapon, and
  • making criminal threats.

Restoring your Second Amendment right to bear arms can be difficult and complicated. We urge you to read the full article, below, for complete information.

In general, however, it may be possible for your gun rights to be restored following a conviction as long as it was not for:

  • a felony involving a dangerous weapon, or
  • a crime of domestic violence.

There are two basic ways to have gun rights restored after an eligible conviction:

  1. by having a "wobbler" felony reduced to a misdemeanor, or
  2. by receiving a pardon from the California governor.

A "wobbler" is an offense that can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor. If you were convicted of a wobbler as a felony, you can petition the court to have it reduced to a misdemeanor. Once your felony is reduced you will be subject only to the restriction -- if any -- that the crime carries as a misdemeanor.

The second way to have your Second Amendment right to bear arms restored after a California conviction is through a pardon by the governor.

You must apply directly to the governor for a pardon if:

  • you live outside California, or
  • you were convicted of certain misdemeanor sex offenses.

Otherwise, obtaining a pardon is a two-step process:

  1. Petition the superior court for a California Certificate of Rehabilitation.
  2. If the petition is granted, it automatically becomes a petition for a pardon from the California Governor.

California's governor has complete discretion to grant or deny pardon requests. Generally, applicants must have resided for a minimum of seven years in California. They must also have had no criminal involvement for at least 10 years.

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We are a criminal defense firm with offices throughout California and Nevada. As former cops and prosecutors, we have first-hand knowledge of California's gun laws. And we know what it takes to restore your right to bear arms.

To help you better understand this process, our California criminal defense attorneys address the following, below:

1. California firearms restrictions

1.1. Lifetime ban -- felonies and weapons-related misdemeanors

1.2. 10-year ban -- specified misdemeanors

1.2.1. Assault

1.2.2. Battery

1.2.3. Domestic violence

1.2.4. Peace officers

1.2.5. Threats and intimidation

1.2.6. Weapons / ammunitions offenses

1.2.6.1. Brandishing
a weapon

1.2.6.2. Discharging a
firearm

1.2.6.3. Possession of
weapons

1.2.6.4. Sale or transfer of
weapons

1.3. Narcotics addicts

1.4. Persons suffering from mental illness

1.5. Minors

1.6. Those under court-imposed restrictions

1.7. Personal firearms eligibility check

2. Federal gun restrictions

2.1. People prohibited from owning a gun under
federal law

2.2. The conflict between federal and California law

2.2.1. Misdemeanor crimes of
domestic violence

2.2.2. Mental Illness

3. How to restore your California gun rights

3.1. Reducing a felony "wobbler" to a misdemeanor

3.2. California Certificate of Rehabilitation /
Governor's pardon

3.2.1. Who is eligible to apply for a California gubernatorial pardon?

3.2.2. California Certificate
of Rehabilitation

3.2.3. Application for a direct pardon

3.2.4. Governor's discretion re: the issuance of pardons

3.3. Expungement of a California criminal record

You may also find helpful information in our related articles on California Firearm Laws; Penal Code 29800 PC Felon with a Firearm; Penal Code 25400 PC Carrying a Concealed Weapon; Penal Code 25850 PC Carrying a Loaded Firearm; Penal Code 417 PC Brandishing a Weapon; Penal Code 245(a)(2) Assault with a Firearm; Penal Code 16590 PC Generally Prohibited Weapons; Penal Code 21310 PC Dirks and Daggers; Penal Code 30600 PC Assault Weapons; Penal Code 18725 PC Destructive Devices; Domestic Violence Convictions and Gun Rights; California Expungement Law; Reducing a Felony to a Misdemeanor; Certificates of Rehabilitation; Governor's Pardons; and California Legal Defenses.

1. California Firearms Restrictions
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Before we discuss how to restore your gun rights, let's review what can make you lose them in the first place.

California law does not require most adults to obtain a license to purchase, receive, own, or possess a gun.

Five categories of individuals, however, are banned from exercising gun rights in California:

  1. felons (that is, anyone convicted of any felony offense in any jurisdiction);
  2. persons convicted of certain misdemeanor offenses (see below);
  3. narcotics addicts;
  4. persons who suffer from mental illness; and
  5. minors (anyone under 18).

Let's take a closer look at each of these categories.

1.1. Lifetime ban -- felonies and weapons-related misdemeanors

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Penal Code 29800 PC is California's "felon with a firearm" law. It imposes a lifetime firearms ban on anyone who has been convicted of a felony offense in any state or country.

This lifetime ban also applies to people with certain misdemeanor convictions:

  1. people with two or more misdemeanor convictions for Penal Code 417(a)(2) PC, California's "brandishing a firearm" law; and
  2. people with just one misdemeanor conviction for:

The lifetime ban also applies to minors who were convicted of any of the above offenses when tried as adults.

1.2. 10-year ban – specified misdemeanors

Generally speaking, a misdemeanor conviction does not trigger a gun restriction. However, under California Penal Code 29805, there are about 40 specific misdemeanor convictions that carry a ten-year firearms ban.

They are:

1.2.1. Assault

  • Penal Code 240 and 241 PC – assault.
  • Penal Code 244.5 -- assault with a stun gun or less lethal weapon (as defined in Penal Code 16780).
  • Penal Code 245 -- assault with a deadly weapon or firearm.
  • Penal Code 245.5 -- assault with a deadly weapon or firearm against a school employee.

1.2.2. Battery

1.2.3. Domestic violence

1.2.4. Peace officers

  • Penal Code 148(d) -- taking a firearm from a peace officer.
  • Penal Code 830.95 -- wearing a peace officer uniform while engaged in picketing.

1.2.5. Threats and intimidation

  • Penal Code 422 PC -- criminal threats.
  • Penal Code 71 and 76 – threats to public officials and/or their families.
  • Penal Code 136.1  -- intimidation of witnesses and victims.
  • Penal Code 136.5  -- possession of a deadly weapon with intent to use it to intimidate witnesses.
  • Penal Code 140  -- threats of force against witnesses, victims or informants.

1.2.6. Weapons / ammunition offenses

1.2.6.1. Brandishing a weapon:

1.2.6.2. Discharging a firearm

  • Penal Code 246.3 -- negligent discharge of a firearm or BB gun.
  • Penal Code 247 -- willful discharge of a firearm at an unoccupied aircraft, motor vehicle, building or dwelling house.
  • Penal Code 26100(b) and (d) -- discharging or permitting another to discharge a firearm from a motor vehicle.

1.2.6.3. Possession of weapons

  • Penal Code 171b -- possession of weapons in public buildings or meetings.
  • Penal Code 171c(a)(1) -- possession of a loaded firearm within the state capitol or legislative offices.
  • Penal Code 171d -- possession of a loaded firearm within the governor's mansion or the residence of state officials.
  • Penal Code 626.9 -- possession of a firearm in a school zone.
  • Penal Code 17500 -- possession of a deadly weapon with the intent to commit assault.
  • Penal Code 17510 -- possession of a deadly weapon or firearm while picketing.
  • Penal Code 25300 -- criminal possession of a firearm (possession of a firearm in a public place while masked).
  • Penal Code 25800 -- armed criminal action (possession of a firearm with the intent to commit a felony).
  • Penal Code 30315 -- possession of metal-piercing or armor-piercing ammunition.
  • Penal Code 32625 -- possession of a machine gun.
  • Welfare and Institutions Code 8100 -- possession of a firearm or deadly weapon by certain persons with mental disorders.
  • Welfare and Institutions Code 8103 -- possession of a firearm or deadly weapon by mentally disordered sex offenders or persons adjuged to be a danger to others.

1.2.6.4. Sale or transfer of weapons

  • Penal Code 186.28 -- sale or transfer of a firearm to a gang member for use in a felony.
  • Former Penal Code 12100(a) -- sale of concealable firearms to juveniles.
  • Penal Code 27510 -- sale or transfer of a firearm to a person under 18.
  • Welfare and Institutions Code 8101 -- sale or transfer of a firearm or deadly weapon to certain persons with mental disorders.
  • Welfare and Institutions Code 871.5 and 1001.5 -- bringing or sending a firearm into a juvenile hall or camp or a Youth Authority institution.
  • Penal Code 27590(c) -- illegal sale or transfer of a firearm.

You may petition the court to have gun rights restored before the 10-year period is up if:

  • you were convicted of one of the above misdemeanors prior to its being added to Penal Code 29805 PC, and
  • you do not have a previous conviction under Section 29805, no matter when the prior conviction occurred.

You may petition for this relief on a one-time basis only. The court may grant it if it finds that you are likely to use a firearm in a "safe and lawful manner."

1.3. Narcotics addicts

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People who are addicted to a narcotic drug are prohibited from possessing firearms.

Federal law imposes a ban on this category of persons as well (see below).

If you are "addicted" to a narcotic drug, it means that you are both emotionally and physically dependent on the drug and have an increased tolerance to its effects.

1.4. People suffering from mental illness

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People with a mental illness are banned from possessing firearms as follows:

  • during any period in which they are receiving voluntary in-patient treatment for being a danger to themselves or others;
  • while under a conservatorship because gravely disabled as a result of a mental disorder or impairment by chronic alcoholism;
  • for 6 months following a serious threat of physical violence against a reasonably identifiable victim or victims;
  • for a period of five years following release from an involuntary commitment to a mental hospital for being a danger to oneself or others;  or
  • for an indefinite period of time if they fall into one of the categories set forth below.

People banned for an indefinite period may not have a gun until they receive a certificate stating that they are no longer a threat to society. After receiving their certificate, such people may petition to have their gun rights restored.

The people subject to this requirement are:

  • those adjudicated by a court of any state to be a danger to others because of a mental disorder or mental illness,
  • those adjudicated by a court of any state to be a mentally disordered sex offender;
  • people declared incompetent to stand trial; and
  • those who have pleaded not guilty to a non-violent crime by reason of insanity.

People who have pleaded not guilty to certain violent crimes by reason of insanity are subject to a lifetime ban on firearm possession.

Such crimes include (but are not limited to):

  • murder,
  • mayhem,
  • rape,
  • residential burglary,
  • arson of an inhabited dwelling, and
  • other felonies involving death or great bodily injury.

Note that federal law imposes its own restrictions on this class of individuals as well.

Thus certain people subject only to a five-year restriction in California may face a lifetime ban under federal law.

Please See Section 2, below, for a more complete discussion of federal law.

1.5. Minors

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Minors are prohibited from owning, possessing, purchasing, or receiving guns. Unless subject to another firearm restriction, people may first possess guns as follows:

  • rifles and shotguns: once they reach the age of 18, and
  • handguns: once they reach the age of 21.

Minors who have been convicted of certain offenses and are adjudged a ward of the juvenile court as a result of their conviction may not possess a firearm until the age of 30.

Such offenses include (but are not limited to):

1.6. Those under court-imposed restrictions

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California courts have the right to impose additional firearms restrictions under two scenarios.

The first is when a judge revokes your gun rights as a specific condition of California probation. The second is when you are the subject of a court-issued protective order.

While you are subject to such restrictions, you are prohibited from owning, possessing, purchasing, or receiving a firearm.

1.7. Personal firearms eligibility check

It is possible to check your firearms eligibility status with the California Department of Justice.

You do not need to disclose your possession of any firearm in order to do so.

The cost for such an eligibility check is $20. The Personal Firearms Eligibility Check Application form is available on the DOJ's website.

2. Federal Gun Restrictions

2.1. People prohibited from owning a gun under federal law

Federal law imposes its own set of firearms restrictions on certain classes of people.

You are prohibited under federal law from possessing a gun if:

you are under indictment for, or have been convicted in any court of, a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year;

  • you are a fugitive from justice;
  • you are an unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance;
  • you have been adjudicated as a mental defective or have been committed to any mental institution;
  • you are unlawfully in the United States;
  • you have been discharged from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions;
  • you have renounced your U.S. citizenship;
  • you are subject to a protective order for stalking or representing a threat to an intimate partner or child; or
  • you have been convicted in any court of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence.

2.2. The conflict between federal and California law

Many of these federal firearms restrictions are identical to those imposed by California law. However, when federal and California gun laws conflict, the federal laws prevail. In such a case, California gun laws may as well not even exist.

2.2.1. Misdemeanor crimes of domestic violence

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One area in which differences arises is after a conviction for a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence ("MCDV").

State law restores California gun rights to an individual convicted of MCDV once a 10-year restriction expires. However, federal law imposes a lifetime firearms ban after such a conviction.

At present, the only way to remove a federal firearms ban is by Presidential pardon. However, presidential pardons are rarely granted.

As a practical matter, therefore, if you are convicted of MCDV in any court, you will never be able to possess a gun legally in California. The only way to avoid the federal lifetime ban is to avoid a domestic violence conviction in the first place.

For a more complete discussion, visit our page on domestic violence convictions & California gun rights.

2.2.2. Mental illness

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California and federal law also conflict in their treatment of mental illness.

California law imposes a five-year firearms ban following involuntary commitment for being a danger to oneself or others.

But federal law provides a lifetime ban on gun ownership by anyone adjudicated a mental defective or committed to a mental institution. As a result, once you have been admitted to a mental institution, it is not possible for you to possess a gun legally in California or anywhere else.

3. How to restore your California gun rights

If you have been convicted of a California felony involving a dangerous weapon, there is no way to restore your firearms rights.   California law defines "dangerous weapon" as any weapon, instrument, or object capable of being used to inflict great bodily injury or death.

And, as noted, federal law prevents California from restoring your gun rights under certain circumstances, including (without limitation):

  • you have been convicted of a crime of domestic violence,
  • you have been adjudicated a mental defective or confined to an institution, oryou are an abuser or unlawful user of a controlled substance.

Otherwise, depending on the type of conviction, there are two ways to restore your California gun rights:

  1. by reducing a felony "wobbler" conviction to a misdemeanor, or
  2. by obtaining a California gubernatorial pardon.

3.1. Reducing a felony "wobbler" to a misdemeanor

A "wobbler" offense is a crime that can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor, in the prosecutor's discretion.

If you were convicted of a qualifying felony wobbler, you can your regain your gun rights by reducing your California felony to a misdemeanor.

For the most part, qualifying wobblers are those for which you were sentenced to county jail and/or probation.

The following are not qualifying offenses:

  • "straight" felonies... that is, crimes that may only be charged as a felony;
  • felonies involving the use of a dangerous weapon;
  • felonies for which you were sentenced to California prison;
  • misdemeanors that subject you to a 10-year gun restriction;
  • domestic violence convictions; and
  • drug offenses that classify you as a "narcotics addict."

Eligible felony wobbler charges can be reduced at any time. Thus you can file a petition if:

  • you were convicted of a wobbler felony and are still on probation (although you will first need to file a petition to have your probation terminated);
  • you were convicted of a felony and are done with probation and/or county jail time; or
  • you were convicted of a felony and were never given any probation at all but were sentenced to county jail.

If the court reduces your felony to a misdemeanor, your right to possess a firearm will generally be restored. However, if the misdemeanor is one that subjects you to a ten-year gun restriction, you will need to wait out the ten years before you may possess a gun.

3.2. California Certificate of Rehabilitation / Governor's pardon

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The second way to restore your California gun rights is by a pardon from California's governor.

Not all pardons restore gun rights. The pardon must specifically be "full and unconditional," or provide you are entitled to exercise the right to possess a gun.

A pardon is not the same as an expungement. A pardon will not seal or erase your criminal record or the record of your conviction.   It can, however, restore to you certain rights, including (without limitation) the right to possess a gun.

3.2.1. Who is eligible to apply for a California gubernatorial pardon?

If you were convicted of a California felony that is ineligible for reduction to a misdemeanor, you may be able to receive a gubernatorial pardon. People convicted of misdemeanor sex crimes are also eligible.

The main requirement for a gubernatorial pardon is exemplary behavior for a long period of time. Generally, an application for a pardon will not be considered unless you have been discharged from probation or parole for at least 10 years without further criminal activity during that period.

Only California crimes may be pardoned by California's governor.

If you were convicted in another state, you must apply for a pardon in that state. If convicted of a felony under federal law, you must apply for a Presidential pardon.

3.2.2. California Certificate of Rehabilitation

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A Certificate of Rehabilitation ("COR") is a court order that declares you rehabilitated of your crime. If you meet the following criteria, you must apply for a COR before seeking a pardon:

  1. you were convicted of a California felony, and
  2. you currently reside in California.

A Certificate of Rehabilitation does not, by itself, restore California gun rights. You must still receive a gubernatorial pardon.  If you are granted a COR, it automatically becomes an application for a California governor's pardon. You do not need to do anything more.

Application for a Certificate of Rehabilitation is made to the superior court in the county where you live. To apply, you must have resided in California for at least five (5) years  after the earliest of:

  1. discharge from custody due to completion of your sentence, or
  2. your release on parole or probation...

plus...

an additional period of two (2) to five (5) years, depending on the underlying offense.

You are not eligible for a California Certificate of Rehabilitation if:

  • you are serving a mandatory life parole,
  • you were committed under a death sentence, or
  • you committed certain sex acts with a child.

3.2.3. Application for a direct pardon

If you are ineligible for a Certificate of Rehabilitation, you may apply for a direct pardon.

This procedure is used primarily by people who:

  1. were convicted of a crime in California and now reside outside the state, or
  2. people who have been convicted of specified misdemeanor sex offenses.

An application for a direct pardon will not normally be considered unless you have been discharged from probation or parole for at least 10 years. You must also not have had any further criminal activity during that period.

Upon demonstration of truly exceptional circumstances... such as actual innocence... the 10-year rule may be waived.

Applications for a direct pardon are available at the California Governor's website. You may also request an application by writing to:

Governor's Office

State Capitol

Attention: Legal Affairs

Sacramento, CA 95814

After you have completed the application, you must send the Notice of Intent to Apply for Executive Clemency to the district attorney of each county in which you were convicted. This is a legally-required notice.

The District Attorney will return the notice to the Governor's Office and send you an acknowledgment. Once you receive it, you can return the completed application to the Governor's Office at the address listed above.

3.2.4. Governor's discretion re: the issuance of pardons

The governor has complete discretion in deciding whether to grant a pardon. This is true for both direct pardons and pardons after issuance of a Certificate of Rehabilitation.

An exception is if you have two (2) or more felony convictions. In such a case, the Governor of California may not grant you a pardon... unless... a majority of justices of the California Supreme Court recommend one. The Governor has no obligation, however, to seek such a recommendation from the court.

As noted, not all pardons restore gun rights. The pardon must specifically provide you are entitled to exercise the right to possess a gun.

3.3. Expungement of a California criminal record

Expungement of a criminal record in California does not remove the ban on owning or possessing firearms.

Expungement refers to the process of:

  1. withdrawing a plea of guilty or no contest, and
  2. having the case dismissed, after successful completion of probation  ... or, if applicable... jail and parole.

The main benefit of expungement is that you do not have to disclose an expunged conviction on most job applications.   But, as noted, expungement does not restore gun rights. If you wish to possess a gun following expungement of a criminal record, you must still follow the steps set forth above.

In addition, not all offenses can be expunged. If you were sent to California state prison, or you are guilty of a serious sex offense, you do not qualify for expungement.

Call us for help...
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Our office does not handle petitions for Certificates of Rehabilitation or gubernatorial pardons.

If you or loved one is in need of help with restoring gun rights and you are looking to hire an attorney for representation, we invite you to contact us at Shouse Law Group. We can provide a free consultation in office or by phone. We have local offices in Los Angeles, the San Fernando Valley, Pasadena, Long Beach, Orange County, Ventura, San Bernardino, Rancho Cucamonga, Riverside, San Diego, Sacramento, Oakland, San Francisco, San Jose and throughout California.

Additionally, our Las Vegas Nevada criminal defense attorneys are available to answer any questions relating to Nevada's firearms laws. For more information, we invite you to contact our local attorneys at one of our Nevada law offices, located in Reno and Las Vegas.

Legal References:

  1. Our California criminal defense attorneys have local Los Angeles law offices in Beverly Hills, Burbank, Glendale, Lancaster, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Pasadena, Pomona, Torrance, Van Nuys, West Covina, and Whittier. We have additional law offices conveniently located throughout the state in Orange County, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura, San Jose, Oakland, the San Francisco Bay area, and several nearby cities.
  2. California Penal Code 25605 (b) -- No permit or license to purchase, own, possess, keep, orcarry, either openly or concealed, shall be required of any citizenof the United States or legal resident over the age of 18 years whoresides or is temporarily within this state, and who is not withinthe excepted classes prescribed by Chapter 2 (commencing with Section29800) or Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 29900) of Division 9 ofthis title, or Section 8100 or 8103 of the Welfare and InstitutionsCode, to purchase, own, possess, keep, or carry, either openly orconcealed, a handgun within the citizen's or legal resident's placeof residence, place of business, or on private property owned orlawfully possessed by the citizen or legal resident.
  3. But see California Penal Code 29800(c) -- Subdivision (a) shall not apply to a person who has been convicted of a felony under the laws of the United States unless either of the following criteria is satisfied:
    (1) Conviction of a like offense under California law can onlyresult in imposition of felony punishment.
    (2) The defendant was sentenced to a federal correctional facilityfor more than 30 days, or received a fine of more than one thousanddollars ($1,000), or received both punishments.
  4. California Penal Code 29800 PC(a) –
    (1) Any person who has been convicted of a felony underthe laws of the United States, the State of California, or any otherstate, government, or country, or of an offense enumerated insubdivision (a), (b), or (d) of Section 23515, or who is addicted tothe use of any narcotic drug, and who owns, purchases, receives, orhas in possession or under custody or control any firearm is guiltyof a felony.
    (2) Any person who has two or more convictions for violatingparagraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 417 and who owns,purchases, receives, or has in possession or under custody or controlany firearm is guilty of a felony.
  5. California Penal Code 29800(b) -- Notwithstanding subdivision (a), any person who has been convicted of a felony or of an offense enumerated in Section 23515, when that conviction results from certification by the juvenile court for prosecution as an adult in an adult court under Section 707 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and who owns or has in possession or under custody or control any firearm is guilty of a felony.
  6. California Penal Code 29805 PC. Except as provided in Section 29855 or subdivision (a) ofSection 29800, any person who has been convicted of a misdemeanorviolation of Section 71, 76, 136.1, 136.5, or 140, subdivision (d) ofSection 148, Section 171b, paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) ofSection 171c, 171d, 186.28, 240, 241, 242, 243, 243.4, 244.5, 245,245.5, 246.3, 247, 273.5, 273.6, 417, 417.6, 422, 626.9, 646.9, or830.95, subdivision (a) of former Section 12100, as that section readat any time from when it was enacted by Section 3 of Chapter 1386 ofthe Statutes of 1988 to when it was repealed by Section 18 ofChapter 23 of the Statutes of 1994, Section 17500, 17510, 25300,25800, 30315, or 32625, subdivision (b) or (d) of Section 26100, orSection 27510, or Section 8100, 8101, or 8103 of the Welfare andInstitutions Code, any firearm-related offense pursuant to Sections871.5 and 1001.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or of theconduct punished in subdivision (c) of Section 27590, and who, within10 years of the conviction, owns, purchases, receives, or has inpossession or under custody or control, any firearm is guilty of apublic offense, which shall be punishable by imprisonment in a countyjail not exceeding one year or in the state prison, by a fine notexceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000), or by both that imprisonmentand fine. The court, on forms prescribed by the Department ofJustice, shall notify the department of persons subject to thissection. However, the prohibition in this section may be reduced,eliminated, or conditioned as provided in Section 29855 or 29860.
  7. See same.
  8. California Penal Code 29860 PC.
  9. Same.
  10. Same.
  11. California Penal Code 29800(a)(1), endnote 4, above.
  12. 18 United States Code 922(d) -- It shall be unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that such person...(3) is an unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance (as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802)).
  13. People v. O'Neil (1965) 62 Cal.2d 748, 750. ("...we must reverse the judgment and remand the cause for a determination of whether the defendant is ‘addicted' to the use of narcotics as we have defined that term in People v. Victor (1965) 62 A.C. 290, 312-315, 42 Cal.Rptr. 199, 398 P.2d 391; i. e., whether he exhibits the three characteristics of the addiction process: (1) ‘emotional dependence' on the drug, (2) an increased ‘tolerance' to its effects, and (3) ‘physical dependence' manifested by withdrawal symptoms upon sudden termination of drug intake.")
  14. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8100(a).
  15. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8103(e)(1).
  16. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8100(b)(1).
  17. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8103(f)(1).
    See also California Welfare and Institutions Code 5150 regarding involuntary commitment.
  18. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8103(a)(1).
  19. Same.
  20. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8103(d)(1).
  21. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8103(c)(1).
  22. California Welfare and Institutions Code 8103(b)(1).
  23. The full list of crimes under California Welfare and Institutions Code 8103(b)(1) is: murder, mayhem, kidnapping (if the victim suffers intentionally inflicted great bodily injury), carjacking or robbery (if the victim suffers great bodily injury), arson of an inhabited dwelling or trailer coach, rape, first degree (residential) burglary, assault with intent to commit murder, assault with intent to commit mayhem or sex crimes (if the victim suffers great bodily injury), reckless or willful possession or explosion of an explosive device, and any felony involving death or great bodily injury, or an act which poses a serious threat of bodily harm to another person.
  24. 18 United States Code 922 (d) -- It shall be unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that such person...(4) has been adjudicated as a mental defective or has been committed to any mental institution.
  25. Any person taken into custody as a danger to self or others, assessed, and admitted to a mental health facility under Welfare and Institutions Code sections 5150, 5151, 5152; or certified under Welfare and Institutions Code sections 5250, 5260, 5270.17; or certified under Welfare and Institutions Code sections 5250, 5260, or 5270.17, may be subject to a lifetime prohibition pursuant to federal law. See California Department of Justice, Bureau of Firearms, Firearms Prohibiting Categories.
  26. California Attorney General's Firearms Website, Frequently Asked Questions -- Sales and Transfers of Firearms. "Although there are exceptions, generally all firearms purchasers must be at least 18 years of age to purchase a long gun (rifle or shotgun) and 21 years of age to purchase a handgun (pistol or revolver)."
  27. California Penal Code 29820 PC.
  28. California Penal Code 29815 PC.
  29. California Penal Code 29825 PC.

    See also California Penal Code 1203.1 (j) -- The court may impose...other reasonable conditions, as it may determine are fitting and proper to the end that justice may be done, that amends may be made to society for the breach of the law, for any injury done to any person resulting from that breach, and generally and specifically for the reformation and rehabilitation of the probationer...

    See also People v. Lent (1975) 15 Cal.3d 481, 486. ("The Legislature has placed in trial judges a broad discretion in the sentencing process, including the determination as to whether probation is appropriate and, if so, the conditions thereof. (Pen. Code, § 1203 et seq.) A condition of probation will not be held invalid unless it ‘(1) has no relationship to the crime of which the offender was convicted, (2) relates to conduct which is not in itself criminal, and (3) requires or forbids conduct which is not reasonably related to future criminality...'" [citation omitted.])
  30. California Penal Code 30105 PC.
  31. See same.
  32. Note that the federal gun ban applies to anyone who has been convicted of a crime that carries more than a year in prison whether or not that person actually served more than a year in prison. See California Penal Code 29800(c)(2).
  33. 18 United States Code 922(d).
  34. See Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Firearms – Frequently Asked Questions; Office of Legislative Research, Research Report 2008-R-0617, Restoration of Right to Carry Firearms Under Federal Law, November 10, 2008.
  35. See endnote 17, above.
  36. 18 USC 922(d).
  37. California Penal Code 4854 PC. In the granting of a pardon to a person, the Governor may provide that the person is entitled to exercise the right to own, possess, and keep any type of firearm that may lawfully be owned andpossessed by other citizens; except that this right shall not berestored, and Sections 17800 and 23510 and Chapter 2 (commencing withSection 29800) of Division 9 of Title 4 of Part 6 shall apply, ifthe person was ever convicted of a felony involving the use of adangerous weapon.
  38. See e.g., Judicial Council of CaliforniaCriminal Jury Instructions (2012) CALCRIM 511 and 3145:
    [A dangerous weapon is any object, instrument, or weapon that isinherently deadly or dangerous or one that is used in such a way that itis capable of causing and likely to cause death or great bodily injury.]
    [Great bodily injury means significant or substantial physical injury. It isan injury that is greater than minor or moderate harm.]
  39. 18 USC 922(d).
  40. See People v. Gilbreth (2007) 156 Cal.App.4th 53, 67 Cal.Rptr.3d 10. (" ‘[O]nce a court has reduced a wobbler to a misdemeanor pursuant to . . . section 17, the crime is thereafter regarded as a misdemeanor 'for all purposes.' This unambiguous language means what it says, and unless the Legislature states otherwise, a person such as [defendant] stands convicted of a misdemeanor, not a felony, for all purposes upon the court so declaring.' (Gebremicael v. California Com. on Teacher Credentialing (2004) [156 Cal.App.4th 58] 118 Cal.App.4th 1477, 1483 (Gebremicael).) Accordingly, defendant's possession of a firearm by a convicted felon must be reversed.").
  41. See State of California, Office of Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr., How to Apply for a Pardon.
  42. California  Penal Code 1203.3.
  43. California  Penal Code 1203.4.
  44. California  Penal Code 1203.4a.
  45. California Penal Code 4854, endnote 37, above.
  46. See How to Apply for a Pardon, endnote 41, above.
  47. The Supremacy Clause of the United States constitution, Article VI, provides:This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.
  48. See the United States Department of Justice, Office of the Pardon Attorney, Pardon Information and Instructions.
  49. See California Penal Code 4852.01-4852.21.
    See also, How to Apply for a Pardon, endnote 41, above.
  50. People discharged or released on parole prior to May 13, 1943 and not incarcerated in a state penal institution since, have a three (3) year residency requirement. See California Penal Code 4852.01 PC (a).
  51. California Penal Code 4852.03.
    (a) The period of rehabilitation shall begin to run uponthe discharge of the petitioner from custody due to his or hercompletion of the term to which he or she was sentenced or upon hisor her release on parole or probation, whichever is sooner. Forpurposes of this chapter, the period of rehabilitation shallconstitute five years' residence in this state, plus a period of timedetermined by the following rules:
    (1) To the five years there shall be added four years in the caseof any person convicted of violating Section 187, 209, 219, 4500, or18755 of this code, or subdivision (a) of Section 1672 of theMilitary and Veterans Code, or of committing any other offense whichcarries a life sentence.
    (2) To the five years there shall be added five years in the caseof any person convicted of committing any offense or attemptedoffense for which sex offender registration is required pursuant toSection 290, except for convictions for violations of subdivision(b), (c), or (d) of Section 311.2, or of Section 311.3, 311.10, or314. For those convictions, two years shall be added to the fiveyears imposed by this section.
    (3) To the five years there shall be added two years in the caseof any person convicted of committing any offense that is not listedin paragraph (1) or paragraph (2) and that does not carry a lifesentence.
    (4) The trial court hearing the application for the certificate ofrehabilitation may, if the defendant was ordered to serveconsecutive sentences, order that his or her statutory period ofrehabilitation be extended for an additional period of time whichwhen combined with the time already served will not exceed the periodprescribed by statute for the sum of the maximum penalties for allthe crimes.
    (5) Any person who was discharged after completion of his or herterm or was released on parole before May 13, 1943, is not subject tothe periods of rehabilitation set forth in these rules.
    (b) Unless and until the period of rehabilitation, as stipulatedin this section, has passed, the petitioner shall be ineligible tofile his or her petition for a certificate of rehabilitation with thecourt. Any certificate of rehabilitation that is issued and underwhich the petitioner has not fulfilled the requirements of thischapter shall be void.
    (c) A change of residence within this state does not interrupt theperiod of rehabilitation prescribed by this section.
  52. California Penal Code 4852.01(d) -- This chapter shall not apply to persons serving a mandatory life parole, persons committed under death sentences, personsconvicted of a violation of subdivision (c) of Section 286, Section288, subdivision (c) of Section 288a, Section 288.5, or subdivision(j) of Section 289, or persons in the military service.
  53. California Penal Code 4852.01(e) Notwithstanding the above provisions or any other provision of law, the Governor shall have the right to pardon a person convicted of a violation of subdivision (c) of Section 286, Section 288, subdivision (c) of Section 288a, Section 288.5, or subdivision (j) of Section 289, if there are extraordinary circumstances.
    See also How to Apply for a Pardon, endnote 41, above.
  54. See California Penal Code 4852.01(d), endnote 52, above.
    See also California Penal Code 290, the "Sex Offender Registration Act," which sets forth the sex crimes subject to PC 4852.01(d).
  55. Same.
  56. Same.
    See also California Penal Code 4852.01(e).
  57. See, How to Apply for a Pardon, endnote 41, above.
  58. See same.
  59. Penal Code 4852.16 -- The certified copy of a certificate of rehabilitationtransmitted to the Governor shall constitute an application for afull pardon upon receipt of which the Governor may, without anyfurther investigation, issue a pardon to the person named therein,except that, pursuant to Section 8 of Article V of the Constitution,the Governor shall not grant a pardon to any person twice convictedof felony, except upon the written recommendation of a majority ofthe judges of the Supreme Court.
  60. People v. Ansell (2001) 25 Cal.4th 868, 891. ("However, regardless of which statutory application procedure is used, and notwithstanding any recommendation by the superior court, the pardon decision is discretionary, and rests ultimately with the Governor.")
    See also California Penal Code 4800 PC -- Constitutional authority. ("The general authority to grant reprieves, pardons and commutations of sentence is conferred upon the Governor by Section 8 of Article V of the Constitution of the State of California.")
    See also California Constitution, Article V, Section 8(a) -- Subject to application procedures provided by statute, the Governor, on conditions the Governor deems proper, may grant a reprieve, [California Governor's] pardon, and commutation, after sentence, except in case of impeachment. The Governor shall report to the Legislature each reprieve, pardon, and commutation granted, stating the pertinent facts and the reasons for granting it. The Governor may not grant a pardon or commutation to a person twice convicted of a felony except on recommendation of the Supreme Court, 4 judges concurring.
    See also California Penal Code 4802 PC -- In the case of a person twice convicted of felony, the application for pardon or commutation of sentence shall be made directly to the Governor, who shall transmit all papers and documents relied upon in support of and in opposition to the application to the Board of Prison Terms.
    See also California Penal Code 4813 PC -- In the case of applications of persons twice convicted of a felony, the Board of Prison Terms, after investigation, shall transmit its written recommendation upon such application to the Governor, together with all papers filed in connection with the application.
    See also How to Apply for a Pardon, endnote 41, above.
  61. California Penal Code 4854 PC, endnote 37, above.
  62. California Penal Code 1203.4(a)(2) [felony convictions] and 1203.4a(c)(2) [misdemeanor convictions] both provide that: "Dismissal of an accusation or information pursuant to thissection does not permit a person to own, possess, or have in his orher custody or control any firearm or prevent his or her convictionunder Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 29800) of Division 9 ofTitle 4 of Part 6 [California's felon with a firearm law].")
  63. California Penal Code 1203.4(a).
  64. Same.
  65. Same.
    For more information, please see our article on Consequences of a Felony Conviction.
  66. California Penal Code 1203.4(b) -- subdivision (a) of this section does not apply to any misdemeanor that is within the provisions of Section 42002.1 of the Vehicle Code, to any violation of subdivision (c) of Section 286, Section 288, subdivision (c) of Section 288a, Section 288.5, or subdivision (j) of Section 289, any felony conviction pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 261.5, or to any infraction.
  67. Please feel free to contact our Nevada criminal defense attorneys Michael Becker and Daria A. Snadowsky for any questions relating to Nevada's firearm laws and restoring your Nevada gun rights. Their Nevada law offices are located in Reno and Las Vegas.

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