Can I Carry a Loaded Gun in Nevada?
A Las Vegas Criminal Defense Attorney Explains the Law

man's waist with holstered handgun

Carrying a loaded gun in Las Vegas or Reno

In general, you may openly carry a loaded firearm in Nevada. You may not carry a loaded gun, however, if:

  • You are under 18 and not accompanied by a parent, guardian or other designee;1
  • You are prohibited by law from possessing a firearm (whether because of a prior conviction, a restraining order, or otherwise); 
  • You have a blood alcohol concentration of .10% or higher or are too stoned or drunk to safely control a firearm (unless you are at home and have the gun for self-defense);2
  • You are in a location where firearms may not legally be carried (see below); or
  • The gun is a loaded rifle or a shotgun and it is in your vehicle.

Concealed carry of a gun is illegal in Nevada unless you have a Nevada permit to carry a concealed weapon (CCV). You must have both your CCW permit and government-issued ID on your person whenever you carry a concealed weapon, whether loaded or unloaded.

Nevada is a “must-issue” state for CCW permits. This means that the sheriff or police chief must issue you a permit to carry a concealed firearm unless you are underage or prohibited by law from possessing a firearm.

For more information on who is legally prohibited from possessing a firearm in Nevada, please see our article on Nevada's "Ex-Felon in Possession of a Firearm" Law..

To learn how to obtain a CCW permit, please see our article on Obtaining a Permit to Carry a Concealed Weapon (CCW) in Nevada.

Can I carry a loaded gun in my car in Nevada?

As long as you are legally permitted to possess a firearm, you may carry a loaded handgun in your car in Nevada.

If you do not have a permit to carry a concealed weapon, however, the loaded handgun may not be concealed upon your person. The gun must either be:

  • Visible in its entirety (for instance, on the seat and not obscured by objects), or 
  • Carried in a concealed place away from your person (such as under your seat, in the glove compartment, or in a box, your purse, your backpack, a briefcase or another container you are not wearing).

Note, however, that if your loaded gun is in your purse, backpack, briefcase or other container and you do not have a CCW permit, you will be violating Nevada's law against carrying a concealed weapon as soon as you get out of your vehicle unless:

  • You carry it openly, or
  • You are on your own property or other private property – such as a gun range -- where it is permitted.

Long guns (such as rifles and shotguns) must always be unloaded when they are in your vehicle in Nevada unless:

  • You are a paraplegic;
  • One or both of your legs have been amputated;
  • You have suffered a paralysis of one or both legs which severely impedes walking; or 
  • You are a peace officer or member of the Armed Forces of Nevada or the United States and you are on duty or going to or returning from duty.3

Note additionally that North Las Vegas city ordinance 9.32.080 prohibits the carrying of dangerous and deadly weapons in vehicles unless carried in good faith for the purpose of “honest work, trade or business, or for the purpose of legitimate sport or recreation.”

However, as this ordinance conflicts with Nevada state law, it is probably unenforceable. Nevertheless, this may not be enough to prevent you from being charged with a violation of this ordinance. Accordingly, you are advised to proceed with caution when carrying a gun (whether or not loaded) in your vehicle in Las Vegas.

Places in Nevada where you may not carry a loaded gun

Unless otherwise legally entitled, under no circumstances may you carry a loaded gun (even in your car) in or on the grounds of:

  • Child care facilities and property;4
  • State schools -- including both public and private K-12, colleges and universities;5
  • Airports;6
  • Prisons, jails and juvenile detention centers;7
  • Police and sheriff's stations;8
  • Government buildings;9
  • County and city parks (if prohibited); 
  • Buildings with metal detectors or signs prohibiting firearms at each public entrance, or
  • Any other place where carrying a firearm is prohibited by federal or state law.

Guns are also prohibited in most buildings and certain other features (such as caves) located in national parks. Before bringing a gun to a national park, you are advised to check with the website of the specific park you plan to visit to find out the specific locations in which guns are prohibited.

Charged with a gun violation in Las Vegas or Reno? Call us for help…

female receptionist wearing headset

If you or someone you know has been arrested for a violation of Nevada gun laws, we invite you to contact us for a free consultation.

Our caring Las Vegas and Reno, Nevada criminal defense lawyers fight weapons charges aggressively and proactively.

To schedule your free consultation, complete the form on this page or call us at 702-DEFENSE (702-333-3673). An experienced gun defense lawyer will get back to you promptly to discuss the best defense to your Nevada gun charges.

California has more restrictive gun carry laws. For more information, please see our article on carrying a loaded firearm in California.


Legal references:

  1. NRS 202.300.
  2. NRS 202.257.
  3. NRS 503.165.
  4. NRS 202.265.
  5. NRS 202.265.
  6. NRS 202.3673.
  7. NAC 202.020.
  8. Same.
  9. Same.

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