Probation Violation Hearing - A Legal Guide

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Top ways people pick up “Probation Violations”

Facing a probation violation? Have a probation revocation hearing? In this video, a former Los Angeles prosecutor explains how the hearing works and what to expect. When a person is placed on felony or misdemeanor probation, the judge imposes certain terms and conditions. These may include paying fines and restitution, reporting to the probation officer, performing community service, and obeying all laws and avoiding a new arrest. A person who violates these terms and conditions faces a probation violation hearing. More info at http://www.shouselaw.com/probation.html


A probation violation hearing is a legal proceeding in which a judge determines whether defendants are in violation of the terms and conditions of their probation. This can occur for defendants serving either misdemeanor probation or felony probation.

This hearing is also known as a “probation revocation hearing.”

An example of a violation that may trigger a hearing includes failure to pay a fine. The failure to appear for a court date is a further example.

Note that there are special evidentiary rules at probation violation hearings (PVH). Some of these are:

If a party is found in violation of probation, then the judge may:

  1. reinstate the probation on the same terms and conditions,
  2. modify the probation with new, stricter terms and conditions, or
  3. revoke the probation and place the person in custody.

If the latter, then the judge can order the person to serve up to the maximum sentence for the crime of which s/he was convicted.

Note that a defendant can use a few strategies to beat an accusation of violating probation. A few of these are:

  1. get help from an experienced criminal defense attorney,
  2. gather facts and evidence that show that he/she is not in violation, and
  3. present mitigating evidence to lessen any punishment if a violation did take place.

Our California criminal defense attorneys will highlight the following in this article:

a judge during a probation violation hearing
A probation violation hearing is a legal proceeding that probationers attend if they violate a condition of their probation.

1. What is a probation violation hearing?

A probation violation hearing is a legal proceeding that probationers must attend if they violate a condition of their probation.1 The hearing is held before a judge.

These hearings are held for violations of both:

  • misdemeanor (or summary) probation, and
  • felony (or formal) probation.

A judge can impose misdemeanor probation for a misdemeanor offense. This is awarded in lieu of jail time. The term for this type of probation may last up to five years.2

A judge can impose felony probation for felony offenses. This is awarded in lieu of jail or prison time. The term for this type of probation is generally between three to five years.3

Note that there are some common violations that will trigger a hearing. Some include:

  1. willful failure to pay a fine or restitution,
  2. failure to appear for a court date,
  3. commission of a new crime, and
  4. failure to submit to a drug test.

If a person violates a condition, then:

  1. a probation officer or a police officer can arrest that person, and
  2. bring him/her to a hearing.

In addition, a judge may issue a bench warrant for the person's arrest.

Example: Sophia is convicted of shoplifting. A judge does not impose a sentence in county jail, but rather puts Sophia on probation and orders her to repay the store for the stolen goods.

Sophia soon falls behind on her scheduled payments. Her probation officer tracks her down and brings her back in front of the judge at a violation hearing. While the judge could put Sophia in jail, he decides against it. He alters her conditions to help her pay the store back.

2. How does a probation violation hearing get initiated?

Depending on the circumstances, a PVH can be initiated by the probation officer, the prosecutor or the judge. One of these parties calls for the hearing after learning the defendant may be in violation.

Probation in every state comes with certain conditions attached. These may include:

  • paying victim restitution,
  • community service,
  • seeking and maintaining gainful employment, and
  • reporting regularly to a probation officer.

When a defendant violates any of these conditions, then he/she:

  • may be arrested, and
  • brought before a judge at a PVH.
judge issuing bench warrant
Bench warrants get their name because they are issued from the “bench,” which means “the judge.”

3. Will the court issue an arrest warrant for a probation violation?

The court will generally issue a bench warrant for a violation. Bench warrants get their name because they are issued from the “bench,” which means “the judge.”

Bench warrants are not the same things as arrest warrants. Arrest warrants are issued because of suspected criminal activity. Bench warrants get issued for such things like:

  • a probation violation,
  • failure to appear for a court date, and
  • failing to obey a court order.

Once issued, a bench warrant gives police the authority to:

  1. arrest the person named in warrant, and
  2. bring that person to court.

Note that a bench warrant generally does not expire. It remains in effect until recalled by the judge.

4. Can a person bail out of jail while awaiting a probation violation hearing?

A person may or may not be able to bail out of jail on a probation violation. Sometimes the judge will issue a "no bail hold." Other times the judge may set bail. Still other times the judge may release the person just on a promise to return to court for the hearing. 

In most states, bail is allowed if:

  • the alleged violation is less serious in nature, or
  • the defendant is in compliance with most of hir or her other terms and conditions.

In most other cases, though, bail will likely be denied.

5. Are there special rules of evidence?

There are special evidentiary rules at PVHs.

In criminal trials, the standard of proof is beyond a reasonable doubt. This means a prosecutor must prove that a defendant is:

  1. guilty, and
  2. this guilt is beyond all reasonable doubt.

But at a hearing, the prosecutor only has to show that:

  • by a preponderance of the evidence,
  • the defendant is in violation.4

This means that the prosecution only needs to prove that:

  • the defendant violated a probation condition, and
  • it is “more likely than not” that he/she did so.

In addition, hearsay evidence is generally admissible at probation violation hearings. This is not true with a criminal trial.

The legal definition of hearsay is a statement that:

  • was made other than by a witness testifying at the trial, and
  • is offered to prove the truth of the content of the statement.5

Example: John is testifying at a murder trial. He tells the jury that his sister, Debbie, told him that the defendant committed the crime.

Here, this statement is hearsay. The statement was made by Debbie and not John, the person testifying. In addition, the statement is being used to prove the truth of its content – that the defendant confessed to the crime.

Note, though, that like a criminal trial, a defendant at these hearings has the following rights:

  1. the right to be represented by an attorney,
  2. the right to call witnesses, and
  3. the right to testify on his/her own behalf.

6. What happens if the court finds a person in violation?

At the conclusion of a hearing:

  • the judge makes a finding as to,
  • whether or not the defendant violated any terms of his/her probation.

If a party is not in violation, then nothing happens. The defendant stays on probation and the conditions remain the same as before the hearing.

If a judge says a party is in violation, then the judge may:

  1. reinstate the defendant's probation on the same terms and conditions,
  2. modify the defendant's probation with new, stricter terms and conditions, or
  3. revoke the probation and sentence the defendant to serve his/her jail or prison sentence.6

Note that if jail or prison is imposed, the sentence is the term that was suspended because of the probation.

Example: Marcos is convicted of trespassing. In most states, the crime is punishable by six months in county jail. The judge orders Marcos to four months in jail. However, he suspends it and puts him on probation, with a condition that he remain employed for a year. Marcos quits his job after a couple of months and doesn't look for a new one.

Given the violation, the judge issues a warrant for Marcos's arrest. The police arrest him and bring him to court for a probation violation hearing. The judge revokes Marcos's probation and orders him to do four months in jail, or the time the judge originally imposed but suspended.

7. What are the best strategies to win a probation violation hearing?

A number of defense strategies can be effective in prevailing at a PVH. A few of these are to:

  1. get the help from an experienced criminal defense attorney,
  2. gather facts and evidence that show that he/she did not violate probation,
  3. present mitigating evidence to lessen any punishment if a violation did take place, and
  4. ask for time served if any jail time is imposed.

As to the last strategy, note that if a judge imposes a jail or prison sentence:

  • the defendant is entitled to credit,
  • for any time previously spent in jail/prison.

For additional help...

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For additional guidance or to discuss your case with a criminal defense attorney, we invite you to contact us at Shouse Law Group.

Legal References:

  1. In California, Penal Code 1203.2 PC is the statute that governs probation violations and probation violation hearings.

  2. See, for example, California Penal Code 1203.1.

  3. See same.

  4. See, for example, People v. Rodriguez (1990) 51 Cal.3d 437.

  5. See, for example, California Evidence Code 1200.

  6. See, for example, Penal Code 1203.1 PC.

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