Nevada "Sex Offender Registration" System

Updated


The Nevada Sex Offender Registry is a database of Nevada residents and visitors who have been convicted of certain sex offenses and crimes against children. Currently there are about 7,200 convicted sex offenders in Nevada.

Nevada law divides convicted sex offenders into three categories. Each "tier" has its own registration requirements:

Classification of Nevada sex offender

Frequency and length of sex offender registration requirement

Tier III offenders in Nevada (NRS 179D.117)

  • Violent sex crimes and non-parental kidnapping. And the most serious crimes against children.

Every 90 days for life

  • identity is publicly searchable

Tier II offenders in Nevada (NRS 179D.115)

  • Certain crime(s) against children

Every 6 months for 25 years

  • identity is publicly searchable

Tier I offenders in Nevada (NRS 179D.113)

  • Crime(s) not considered Tier II or Tier III offenses

Every year for 15 years

  • identity is not publicly searchable unless the victim was a child

Failing to register as a sex offender (NRS 179D.550) is a separate crime. It carries possible Nevada State Prison time. But certain offenders may be eligible for early termination of sex registry requirements.

Being a convicted sex offender carries a social stigma. And it could ruin the defendant's future employment and living prospects. But it may be possible to fight the charges.

In this article, our Las Vegas criminal defense attorneys discuss:

sign (NRS 179D)
Tier I offenders are not publicly searchable on the Nevada Sex Offender Registry database under NRS 179D unless the victim is a child.

1. What is the Nevada Sex Offender Registry?

The Nevada Sex Offender Registry is a public database. It includes people convicted of certain sex offenses. As well as certain crimes against children.

People search the database to see if there are offenders nearby. The Registry also goes by "Adam Walsh registry."

Tier III and Tier II offenders are publicly searchable. Tier I offenders are searchable when the victim is a child. Tier I offenders where the victim is an adult are not searchable.1

2. How are sex offenders classified?

Nevada law has three categories of convicted sex offenders. From most serious to least serious, they are:

scarlet A
Tier III offenders register for life.
  1. Tier III (a.k.a. Tier 3);
  2. Tier II (a.k.a. Tier 2); and
  3. Tier I (a.k.a. Tier 1)

2.1. Tier III offenders in Nevada

Tier 3 classification is the most serious. It is for violent sex crimes, non-parental kidnapping, and serious crimes involving children. Especially young children.

Specifically, Tier 3 crimes include:

According to the U.S. Department of Justice's review of Nevada sex offender law, Tier 3 offenses also include:

Tier III offenders are publicly searchable through the Nevada sex offender registry. As discussed in the next section, Tier 3 offenders must register at least once every 90 days for life.2

Learn more about Tier III sex offenders in Nevada (NRS 179D.117).

2.2. Tier II offenders in Nevada

Tier 2 classification is for crimes against children. Specifically, Tier 2 crimes include the following. But only if the victim is under 18 years old:

  • Any offense comparable or more severe than those in 42 U.S.C. § 16911(3); and
  • An attempt or conspiracy to commit any of the above;

Additionally, Tier 2 crimes include the following felonies:

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Tier II offenders in Nevada must register for 25 years.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice's review of Nevada sex offender law, Tier 2 offenses also include:

Finally, Tier 1 offenders get reclassified as Tier 2 if later convicted of a felony Tier 1 offense. See the next subsection for a list of Tier 1 offenses.

Tier 2 offenders are publicly searchable. As discussed in the next section, Tier 2 offenders must register once every 180 days for 25 years.3

Learn more about Tier 2 sex offenders in Nevada (NRS 179D.115).

register sign
Tier I offenders must register for 15 years.

2.3. Tier I offenders in Nevada

Tier 1 classification is generally reserved for defendants convicted of non-violent sex crimes.

Specifically, Tier 1 crimes include the following:

In addition, Tier 1 crimes include the following offenses if they are sexually motivated:

Although Nevada law does not specifically state it, it appears that people convicted of the following offenses are also required to register as a Tier 1 offender:

Tier I offenders with adult victims are not publicly searchable on the Nevada sex offender registry. Tier I offenders with child victims are. As discussed in the next section, Tier 1 offenders must register at least once a year for 15 years.4

Learn more about Tier 1 sex offenders in Nevada (NRS 179D.113).

3. What are the sex offender registration requirements?

Adjudicated sex offenders in Nevada must:

  1. Register with the local police. This must occur within 48 hours of getting released. It includes submitting to fingerprints, palm prints, and DNA samples;
  2. Inform local police within 48 hours of any changes. This names, residence, address, employment, or student status. (For example, see the LVMPD Sex Offender registration page.);
  3. Inform local police when in a location for longer than 30 days after reporting a visit of fewer than 30 days;
  4. Submit an annual verification form; and
  5. Regularly appear in person at a local police station:
    1. Tier 1 offenders must register once a year for 15 years;
    2. Tier 2 offenders must register once every 180 days for 25 years;
    3. Tier 3 offenders must register once every 90 days for life5

Otherwise, offenders face additional felony charges. (As discussed in the next section.)

Note that offenders need to renew their driver's license annually. And out-of-state offenders must abide by Nevada's registration requirements while in Nevada.6

4. What happens if an offender fails to register?

It is a felony not to register as a sex offender as required. The penalty depends on whether the person has previous convictions of failing to register:

Failure to Register as a Sex Offender in Nevada Penalties

First offense

Category D felony

  • 1 – 4 years in prison
  • up to $5,000 (at the judge's discretion)

The judge may grant probation in lieu of incarceration.

Subsequent offense (within 7 years of the first)

Category C felony

  • 1 – 5 years in prison
  • up to $10,000 (at the judge's discretion)

The judge may not grant probation in lieu of incarceration.

The Nevada DMV will also deny people a renewal of their driver's license if they fail to register.7

5. How can someone get removed from the registry?

Early termination of Nevada sex offender registration requirements may be possible if:

  • The person is a Tier I offender who has registered for at least 10 consecutive years; or
  • The person is a Tier III offender who has registered for at least 25 years, and the underlying offense was a juvenile delinquency

(There is no way for Tier II offenders to shorten their requirement to register for 25 years.)

In order to be considered for early termination, eligible Tier I or Tier III offenders must meet the following four requirements:

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Tier II offenders are not eligible for early termination of registration requirements.
  1. Have not been convicted of another felony (or other crime carrying potentially more than 1 year in prison);
  2. Have not been convicted of any other sex crime;
  3. Have completed any periods of supervised release, probation or parole; and 
  4. Have completed a sex offender treatment program certified by the state of Nevada or the Attorney General of the United States.

Note that early termination of registration requirements is not automatic. The person must file a petition in the local district court, and the court will hold a hearing to decide whether to grant the petition.8

Also note that early termination does not:

But it may be possible to get civil rights and gun rights restored through a Nevada pardon.

6. How can someone search the registry?

In order to access the Registry, the public can either go to the official website or call 775-684-6262. The public can also email the Registry at [email protected] or write a letter to:

Nevada SOR

333 W. Nye Lane, Suite 100

Carson City, NV 89706

The public can search the Registry in any of the following four ways:

  1. By first and/or last name;
  2. By zip code;
  3. By one, two, or three miles within a specific address; or
  4. By license plate number

The Registry provides the following information about Tier II and Tier III offenders as well as Tier I offenders with child victims:

  • Name and known aliases;
  • Date of birth;
  • Gender;
  • Primary address and other addresses (such as employer or school);
  • Physical description (race, height, weight, hair color, eye color, scars, tattoos, other marks);
  • Photographs;
  • Tier Level (only Tiers II and III are searchable in the registry); and
  • Conviction information (date, description, court, name convicted under, city-township of conviction, location of penal institution and/or hospital, and statute violated)

State workers try to keep the Registry as updated and correct as possible, but there are some errors. Contact the Registry at 775-684-6262 to inform them of inaccuracies.

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Call our Las Vegas criminal defense attorneys at 702-DEFENSE for a FREE consultation today.

Call a Nevada criminal defense attorney...

Have you been arrested in Nevada for a sex crime or a crime against a child? Then it is imperative you consult with an attorney right away. A conviction could not only put you behind bars and cost you thousands. It can land you on the Nevada Sex Offender Registry.

Call our Las Vegas criminal defense attorneys at 702-DEFENSE (702-333-3673) for a FREE consultation. We may be able to get your charges reduced to a lesser offense or dismissed completely.

In California? Learn about California sex offender registry laws.

In Colorado? Learn about Colorado sex offender registry laws.


Legal References

  1. NRS 179D.151; NRS 179D.160; NRS 179D.170; Geoff Dornan, "New sex offender registration law in effect in Nevada," Nevada Appeal (October 19, 2018).
  2. NRS 179D.117; NRS 179D.480; Nevada Assembly Bill 579 (2007).
  3. NRS 179D.115; Id.
  4. NRS 179D.113; Id.
  5. NRS 179D.151; NRS 179D.160; NRS 179D.170; NRS 179D.480.
  6. NRS 483.283.
  7. NRS 179D.550.
  8. NRS 179D.490.

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